You as the hiring manager or business owner hold the key to significantly increase the probability of a successful hire by ensuring that the process outlined below happens before someone posts the same old job ad or modifies a similar one from the internet. Taking time now could save you weeks, lots of money or, at the very least, many hours in screening resumes and interviews.

Job postings are a 'cross your fingers' and hope that your high potential top player is thinking of doing something new AND he/she happens to have some spare time to search through job postings. It does sometimes happen, but in today’s very low unemployment job market that same ‘A’ player has already been engaged by one or more recruiters. If one of the openings is a good fit and the recruiter is good at what they do, then their client will get the top person before this person even notices any job ads. So what can you do to get the top players?

The hiring process is fraught with potential disaster since a bad hire can set you back months or, at a minimum, cost you tens of thousands is wages and lost opportunity, so do not enter this process without some thought and planning.  If hiring is only one of your many urgent priorities, execute these top 3 hiring tips and you will significantly increase your probability of a successful hire.

Good people have choices in this employee marketplace.  Listed below are 10 common experiences that have caused candidates to judge a job, boss or company poorly and thus causing them to hesitate in taking the next step. For advice on how to plan for and avoid some of these common missteps, download our 'How to prepare for an interview in 20 minutes' at the end of this article.

10 ways to lose a top candidate:

Most small business owners are not aware of the tremendous benefits of leveraging the services and expertise of a staffing company.  Many owners have a vague recollection of working with a temp in their corporate life in a larger company but are unaware of how staffing companies can help their smaller enterprises.

Business owners who have discovered the many advantages of using a staffing agency are reaping the benefits of costs savings, better access to top talent, less administrative work, workforce flexibility, and a better-engaged workforce.

When he was a consultant Jim Whitehurst, CEO Red Hat, discovered something amazing,

“One of the most surprising aspects of that work was that people would open up to me, an outsider, about all the elephants in tIgnoring the Elephant in the Roomhe room — but they were too polite or embarrassed to call out the obvious issues or blame their peers inside their own organizations. My fellow consultants and I would sometimes joke that just about every individual inside a company could immediately tell you what was going wrong and what needed fixing. But whenever everybody convened for a meeting to point out those very issues, you wouldn’t hear a peep about anything that could be perceived as negative. To our amazement, they were more open to hearing feedback from us, the outsiders, than from their own colleagues.”

Though this phenomena is good for consultants, shouldn’t companies be having candid conversations on their own?

An MD, a lawyer, an insurance specialist, and an EH&S expert walked into an NCHR-SD luncheon and …    provided a great panel discussion on the why, what, and how of workers compensation fraud. Outlined below are my top takeaways from their expert advice on how to mitigate or avoid WC fraud.

First, the panel emphasized how important it is to understand the potential reasons why people commit WC fraud. Financial gain is the obvious one but just as common a reason is an employee using a claim to solve other challenges such as he/she:

Adapted from Labor & Employment Law Blog by Timothy Kim, May 1, 2018

On Monday, April 30, 2018, the California Supreme Court issued a landmark decision that reinterpreted and ultimately rejected the Borello test for determining whether workers should be classified as either employees or independent contractors for the purposes of the California wage orders.

The Court embraced a standard presuming that all workers are employees instead of contractors, and placed the burden on any entity classifying an individual as an independent contractor of establishing that such classification is proper under the newly adopted “ABC test”, outlined below.

The attendees at the March NCHR-SD monthly professional development meeting had the privilege of hearing the transformational stories of the Scripps Health turnaround and learning Chris Van Gorder’s 10 Principles of Front-Line Leadership – an authentic, back-to-the-basics approach that can strengthen relationships, improve trust and build a strong corporate culture that will sustain an organization in bad times, good times and times of extreme change.His 10 principles are ....

At a recent workshop, local Employment Law attorneys, Lou Storrow and Chris Olmsted, presented a summary of new legislation and compliance requirements coming January 1, 2018 that may require you to adjust your HR processes and policies. Even though you may not have time to adapt to legislative changes, employee complaints may result in legal fees, penalties, and payouts. It is important to also be aware that the Labor Commissioner has stepped up enforcement efforts and can now conduct an investigation without an employee complaint. 2016 amendments to PAGA1 also gave the Labor Commissioner more time and funds to investigate. With increased DLSE funding investigative staff are projected to grow from the current 82 to 141 by 2018/19.  

Now that I’ve made you a bit more aware of the risks of non-compliance (sorry for the negative news) let me outline some of the most relevant changes you need to be aware of.

Posted by: Leanne Abraham

Understanding the IRS and state regulations, as well as the case law, to determine if a contractor should be classified as an employee may be confusing but do not avoid it or put it off. Make sure you have the right classification before a contractor starts work or it could cost you down the road.  The penalties, fines and legal costs could run into the six figures or more depending on how many workers are involved.

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